SteelCell SOFC technology to help develop fuel cell tech for EVs in the UK

SteelCell SOFC Technology for EV applications - EV Charging

Ceres Power has partnered with Nissan to help improve electric vehicle (EV) applications. UK-based Ceres Power, developers of the SteelCell SOFC technology, has teamed up with Japanese motor company, Nissan, to further develop fuel cell technology for electric vehicle applications in the UK. The fuel-flexible and low-cost technology can generate power from conventional fuels. The SteelCell Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) tech is low-cost and fuel flexible. It is capable of producing power from natural gas and other conventional fuels, as well as from sustainable fuels, like hydrogen, ethanol or…

Read More

h2e Power uses solid oxide fuel cell tech to bring clean and affordable energy to all

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology - h2e CHP system and SOFC tech

The cleantech company is building a unique CHP system to generate clean power 24/7. Indian cleantech company, h2e Power Systems Inc., builds combined heat and power (CHP) solutions using solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology for the purpose of providing clean, green, reliable and affordable energy for all, including to those who live in rural areas. Their CHP solutions based on SOFC tech delivers off-grid and grid-connected distributed power generation. The cleantech company, which was founded in 2009, has created a fuel cell power module, h2e-HPM-1000, which utilizes unique solid…

Read More

Nissan shows off new solid oxide fuel cell vehicle in Brazil

Olympics gives Nissan an opportunity to show off its new clean vehicle The 2016 Olympic Games are in full swing in Brazil and Japanese automaker Nissan has taken the chance to show off its first solid oxide fuel cell vehicle. The new car is powered entirely by ethanol and an ethanol-water blend. The solid oxide fuel cell consumes ethanol in order to generate hydrogen, which is then used to produce electricity. According to Nissan, the vehicle is so efficient it can travel nearly 400 miles before needing to be refueled.…

Read More

Nissan moves forward with plans for solid oxide fuel cell system

Automaker moves new fuel cell system into prototype vehicle Nissan is moving forward with its innovative solid oxide fuel cell technology. The Japanese automaker recently revealed this new technology and has now incorporated into a new prototype vehicle. The company has modified and existing e-NV200 van so that it can run on electrical power. This power will be produced by the solid oxide fuel cell. The fuel cell consumes bio-ethanol in order to produce power and the system removes the need to store hydrogen under high pressures. Vehicle will be…

Read More

Nissan developing new solid oxide fuel cell system for vehicles

New fuel cell system will make use of bio-ethanol rather than hydrogen Japanese automaker Nissan has announced that it is researching and developing a solid oxide fuel cell system that will be used to power vehicles. The system is being designed to run on bio-ethanol, which will be used to generate electrical power. The new system is meant to serve as an alternative to hydrogen fuel cells, which have been growing in popularity throughout the transportation space for some time. The system will be complimented by what is called an…

Read More

Global Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Market To Register A Whopping 9.78% CAGR till 2020: MarketResearchReports.Biz

MarketResearchReports.Biz has announced addition of new report “Global Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Market 2016-2020” to its database. About SOFC An SOFC is a fuel cell that produces electricity through an electrochemical process. SOFCs offer low emissions, long-term stability, high efficiency, and fuel flexibility. The excellent fuel flexibility of the devices permit the use of safe, cheap, and readily available fuels such as hydrocarbons, natural gas, hydrogen, methanol, and syngas. SOFCs, however, require a high operating temperature, usually within the range of 500C-1,000C for the activation of the electrolyte. These high…

Read More

University of Maryland researchers develop new solid oxide fuel cells

University of Maryland

A team of researchers from the University of Maryland have developed a new solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) which they claim is more effective than the more conventional models of fuel cells currently available. SOFC’s have been quite popular as a stationary fuel cell unit. Stationary units are most often used in residential settings, but may soon come to the auto industry with this new development from the University of Maryland. Apart from cost, fuel cells face other challenges that keep them from being used by companies. Operating temperature is…

Read More

Scientists at the University of Illinois find inroads into hydrogen fuel cell size factor

University of Illinois

Environmental concerns and the interest of energy independence has been a driving force behind hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen has been singled out from the midst of other renewable energy sources for its ability to produce power comparable to oil. Fuel cells are a rare achievement, symbolizing a product that countless engineers and scientists have labored to make possible. There have been many obstacles hampering the progress and incorporation of hydrogen fuel cells, but they are being overcome by ambitious researchers all around the world. As infrastructure for a hydrogen powered transportation…

Read More

Hydrogen powered commercial ships only make sense…

Hydrogen fuel cells for Commercial Ships

Large commercial seagoing vessels have relied on diesel engines for years. These vessels require a massive amount of fuel and energy to operate, and no other engine has been able to meet these requirements. However, research done by Germanischer Lloyd, a classification society based in Germany who specializes in ships, gas, oil and renewable, suggests that hydrogen fuel cells may be a viable option for large vessels. The group has found that high-temperature fuel cells, in particular, are well suited to such an environment. However, GL suggest that the sudden…

Read More