Ant and bee venom might be the answer to storage

Ant and bee venom might be the answer to storage

April 24, 2011 0 By Angie Bergenson

Free shipping Electric Bicycle for Sale, Enjoy 30- Day Trial & 2- Year Warranty Order Now!

Hydrogen fuel cells are being used for more than just cars and buses.

Researchers at the Oxford University in England have been developing a new fuel cell unit that can fit in a pocket. The fuel cell would be used to charge mobile devices as well as laptops and phones. While other companies have successfully manufactured portable fuel cells, researchers are developing a new hydrogen production method using formic acid.

Formic acid is common in nature. It is most present in the venom of ants and bees, but is used in a number of industries for its preservative properties. Researchers are interested in the acid because it can be stored as a liquid without the need of pressurization, making it easier to store in fuel cells.

Oxford scientists still have a long way to go before their fuel cells are ready for commercial testing.

Researchers have already had success using a catalyst made of palladium atoms and silver particles which converts formic acid into hydrogen through a chemical reaction. They believe that this method removes the need for hydrogen to be stored in fuel cells themselves, giving them the ability to create the gas on demand.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Clean Energy Quotes To Remember - “For example, a breakthrough in better batteries could supplant hydrogen. Better solar cells could replace or win out in this race to the fuel of the future. Those, I see, as the three big competitors: hydrogen, solar cells and then better batteries.”

- Bob Inglis, Politician

---------------------------------------------------------------------

This new technology stands to make hydrogen fuel cells more viable for commercial incorporation. As the world continues to look for alternatives to fossil-fuels, hydrogen fuel cells have become a popular solution.

Oxford researchers will continue testing their method, hoping to begin practical testing by 2012.