First ever in-office paper recycling technology unveiled by Epson

Epson’s PaperLab is more efficient than traditional paper recycling processes.

Epson, the well-known printer company, has created an in-office paper recycling technology, a machine called the PaperLab, which takes waste paper and transforms it into crisp white printer paper. According to Epson, its paper reprocessing system is more efficient than sending waste paper to a traditional off-site recycling plant.

The machine can recycle paper within three minutes.

Within three minutes of adding waste paper to the PaperLab, the machine produces new sheets of perfectly white paper. It can create about 14 A4 sheets of paper in one minute or 6,720 fresh sheets in a typical eight-hour workday, reported ARS Technica. In addition to A4 paper, the machine can also produce A3 paper, as well as allows users to alter the thickness and density of the paper, making it possible for the recycling system to produce paper thick enough for business cards.

The PaperLab uses a dry process recycling technology.

According to Epson, the PaperLab is the first paper production system in the world to use a “dry process” for its recycling method. Most traditional paper-making processes generally require a notable amount of water and the use of chemicals, but Epson says that its “Dry Fiber Technology” is more eco-friendly and breaks down wastepaper into thin fibers without water, using mechanical pressure.

While the printer giant has not shared any specific details on how the system works, it says that as the waste paper is broken down, ink is removed. Binding agents are added to the fibers and pressure is utilized to produce paper of different fragrances and colors.

Due to the Dry Fiber Technology, the company claims that the PaperLab will not require plumbing. That being said, it still requires a very tiny amount of water to maintain the humidity necessary for the machine’s interior.

In addition to recycling paper, the machine also provides the benefit of security because it breaks down paper into paper fibers, so confidential documents can be destroyed onsite instead of sending these documents to be shredded by outside contractors.

Epson will be showcasing its recycling technology at Tokyo’s Eco-Products exhibition, which runs from December 10 – 12. From there the company intends to enter the PaperLab into commercial production starting in Japan next year.

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