Hydrogen fuel stations are inoperable in California

July 27, 2015 0 By Alicia Moore
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Drivers are reporting problems with hydrogen stations in the state

California is one of the leading clean transportation markets in the United States, with many consumers opting to purchase electric vehicles and those powered by hydrogen fuel cells. For the most part, conventional electric vehicles have been well received among consumers, though their limited operational range has left much to be desired. For those with fuel cells, however, this is not the case, as many have begun reporting problems with the state’s hydrogen fuel infrastructure.

Fuel cells continue to gain momentum in the auto industry, but infrastructure is lacking

Fuel cells consume hydrogen to produce electrical power. This energy powers the vehicles that are equipped with fuel cell systems and this production of power does not generate any harmful emissions. As such, hydrogen fuel cells are considered to be an environmentally friendly, which makes them quite attractive to those interested in clean transportation. The problem, however, is that these vehicles lack the support of a comprehensive hydrogen fuel infrastructure, which limits their attraction to consumers.

Drivers report that fueling stations are inoperable in many parts of the state

Hydrogen Fuel Stations - CaliforniaMany consumers in California with fuel cell vehicles have reported that they enjoy driving their vehicles, but they have a significant problem with the state’s fueling infrastructure. Drivers are reporting that fueling stations are inoperable, with some drivers reporting that fueling stations have been closed for days or even weeks. These complaints have been issued among private Facebook groups that are reserved for those driving the few fuel cell vehicles that are currently available.

Automakers are not responsible for managing the state’s hydrogen fuel infrastructure

While automakers have begun promoting fuel cell vehicles quite aggressively, they are not responsible for the hydrogen fuel infrastructure that exists in California. Automakers have invested in infrastructure in prominent markets, but they are not tasked with managing fueling stations. This task falls to a variety of organizations that have developed and built the fueling stations that are currently in operation. If these stations cannot offer reliable access to hydrogen fuel, automakers may lose out on the success that their new vehicles could see.