Port of Honolulu becomes home to new hydrogen fuel cell project

March 6, 2014 0 By Erin Kilgore
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New project aims to use fuel cells to provide power to docked and anchored ships

Hydrogen Fuel Projects - HonoluluThe Port of Honolulu in Hawaii is set to be home to a new project involving hydrogen fuel cells. The project is being managed by a team of researchers from Sandia National Laboratories. The team has partnered with several other groups that have a vested interest in fuel cells and how they can be used as primary energy systems. Fuel cells tend to receive the majority of their attention for their uses in transportation, but these energy systems can be used for many purposes.

Fuel cells expected to arrive and bet put to use at some point in 2015

The project aims to analyze the use of fuel cells as energy systems for docked and anchored ships. Researchers are currently developing what they believe will be a highly portable hydrogen fuel cell that is expected to be put to use at the Port of Honolulu in 2015. This energy system will be used to provide electrical power to ships that make use of the port and will serve as an alternative to more traditional forms of power.

Fuel cells may be a viable alternative to other types of energy systems

Fuel cells are gaining more attention as primary energy systems because of their ability to produce large amounts of electrical power without also producing harmful emissions. Fuel cells have a limited impact on the environmental as they produce only water vapor as a byproduct of their operation. They are, however, quite expensive because of their use of costly materials, such a platinum. The high cost of fuel cells is what typically makes these energy systems unattractive to those interested in renewable energy.

Researchers aim to determine the value of fuel cells

According to researchers from Sandia National Laboratories, hydrogen fuel cells are more efficient energy producers than diesel generators and other energy systems. The new project aims to determine just how much more efficient fuel cells can be while also examining the costs associated with using these energy systems to power ships that make use of the Port of Honolulu.