Light recycling technology prevents incandescent bulbs from wasting energy

Researchers may have found a way to make traditional light bulbs more energy efficient. Scientists at MIT and Purdue University have created a new recycling technology involving incandescent lights that enables this type of light to be more energy efficient. These warm glowing conventional light bulbs, which were first commercialized by Thomas Edison, have fallen out of favor over the past several years because they are far less efficient than compact fluorescents and LEDs. However, researchers have created a super-efficient two-stage incandescent bulb that reuses the heat it emits, allowing…

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Scientists combine solar energy and hydrogen fuel cells to create “hydricity”

Scientists are experimenting with hydricity, a new term for an increasingly common concept Scientists from Purdue University in the U.S. and the Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne in Switzerland have begun experimenting with something called “hydricity.” This is a new term for something that is becoming relatively common: The combination of solar energy with hydrogen fuel cells. Specifically, this refers to the use of thermal solar power, which has been growing more popular throughout the world, especially in countries that have become heavily invested in clean energy. Concentrated solar energy…

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Alternative energy becomes focus of new research partnership

U.S. Navy teams up with Purdue University to investigate alternative fuel sources. The U.S. Navy is collaborating with researchers at Purdue to help the country’s military take steps toward a greener future and they have begun working toward finding alternative energy sources for liquid fuels needed for transportation. The alternative fuel being researched is similar to gasoline. According to the director of Purdue’s Energy Center in Discovery Park, Maureen McCann, the biofuel the university is studying is chemically alike gasoline and aviation fuel. The main difference between the two is…

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Sorghum may be capable of improving the stance of biofuels

biofuels alternative energy

Researchers identify sorghum as a promising source of energy Sorghum, a plant whose various species are used for food around the world, may be the key to the future of biofuels. Researchers at Purdue University have been experimenting with the plant recently, hoping to find a new way to create environmentally friendly fuels. Along with scientists from Cornell University and the University of Illinois, the Purdue team have found that sorghum may be a source of sustainable biofuel without the need of a new infrastructure to support it. Biofuels continues…

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Biofuel production process from Purdue University hailed as promising breakthrough

Green Fuel - Biodiesel

H2Boil method used to produce biofuel through use of biomass materials and hydrogen gas Researchers from Purdue University have developed a new process for creating biofuels. The process have shown promise in making affordable, production scale biofuels available to a wide range of consumers, which could make this form of energy a viable competition with fossil-fuels. The process is known currently as the H2Boil method, which utilizes pressurized hydrogen gas, high temperatures, and biomass materials such as switchgrass and corn stover. According to economic analysis conducted by the university, the…

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Purdue University develops new material that generates electricity by harvest heat

Purdue-University-Energy-research

Alternative energy research gives way to new thought on harvesting heat… Researchers from the Purdue University are experimenting with nanotechnology to develop new techniques to harvest energy from engines. According to Yue Wu, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University, approximately 58% of energy in the U.S. is wasted as heat. Energy systems, such as internal-combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells, generate significant amounts of heat as a byproduct of their normal functions. Professor Wu claims that if 10% of this ambient heat energy can be recovered, it could…

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