The problem with electric vehicles may be infrastructure, not technology

The problem with electric vehicles may be infrastructure, not technology

February 13, 2013 0 By John Max

Electric Vehicles charging station

Industry experts suggest infrastructure is hurting the progress of electric vehicles

Despite turbulence in the past and present, electric vehicles and hybrids are becoming more accepted by consumers around the world. These consumers have been growing more environmentally conscious as information concerning climate change and its potential effects becomes more prolific. While the auto industry continues to struggle with which type of clean transportation to support — battery electrics or hydrogen fuel — the matter may not actually be one of affordability or the viability of new technology for electric vehicles.

Technology may not be the most problematic issue for clean transportation

According to environmental and regulatory experts with Toyota, Honda, and Chrysler, the problem concerning clean transportation and electric vehicles is not actually an issue regarding technology. Instead, these experts suggest that the problem lies in the lack of a comprehensive infrastructure that is capable of supporting electric vehicles. In the case of hydrogen fuel, this infrastructure is almost non-existent.

California works to bolster hydrogen fuel infrastructure

Some of the auto industry’s favored markets, such as that in California, have been working to bolster their hydrogen fuel and electric vehicles infrastructure in recent months. More than 100 new hydrogen fuel stations are planned for construction throughout California, while an expansive electric charging station network is also taking form in the state. Auto industry experts expect that this will send a strong message to consumers that clean transportation is viable, but whether consumers will listen to this message has yet to be seen.

Electric vehicles may still give way to conventional technologies

The auto industry has taken a strong liking to hydrogen fuel. Most of the world’s major automakers are developing hydrogen-powered vehicles for release in 2015. While these types of electric vehicles have won the favor of automakers, industry experts suggest that conventional vehicles will continue to dominate the market. More efficient technologies will make these vehicles more accepted by consumers that are interested in protecting the environment and will not require the establishing of a new fuel infrastructure in order to continue being successful.